• EveryCubEver

    Ernie Banks

    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Weeks Historical Events
    Sep 4th, 2019
    1 Comment
    2056 Views
    September 9th, 1965. The place was Dodgers Stadium in Los Angeles. 29,130 fans in the stands witnessed one of the best pitched games in Major League History. On the mound for the Dodgers was Sandy Koufax, on his way to his second Cy Young (he would a third in 1966). For the Cubs, Bob Hendley, [&helli...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Sep 3rd, 2019
    2 Comments
    3466 Views
    September 3, 1936. A police officer may have cost the Cubs a victory. Henry Hanson was an ordinary Chicago cop. He was working security at a Cubs-Dodgers game. In the first inning of the game, young Cubs first baseman Phil Cavarretta hit a ball down the right field line, right were Hanson was standin...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Aug 27th, 2019
    3 Comments
    3303 Views
    August 29, 1918 The Cubs clinched the National League pennant with a double-header sweep of the Cincinnati Reds. Lefty Tyler wins his 18th game in the opener, and Claude Hendrix wins his 20th game in the nightcap. It is the earliest any team in National League history clinched a pennant, but that rec...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Aug 20th, 2019
    1 Comment
    2693 Views
    August 22, 1982 The Cubs retire the first number in franchise history: #14 in honor of Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks. No-one had worn #14 since Ernie retired as a coach in 1973, but by raising the #14 flag the Cubs make it official. In the lineup for the Cubs that day is a rookie third […]...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Aug 18th, 2019
    0 Comments
    2070 Views
    ~Burleigh Grimes 1893–1985 (Cubs 1932-1933) Grimes never shaved on days he pitched, because the slippery elm he chewed to increase saliva irritated his skin, so he always had stubble on his face when he took the mound. That led to his nickname, Ol’ Stubblebeard. He wasn’t just known for his stu...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Aug 13th, 2019
    2 Comments
    3345 Views
    August 13, 1987 The Cubs retire the number of one of the all-time greats: Good Ol’ Number 26, Billy Williams. It is only the second number they ever retired (Ernie was first). Maybe there is some magic in the air, because the woeful Cubs come back to win the game in dramatic fashion. Catcher Jo...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Weeks Historical Events
    Aug 7th, 2019
    0 Comments
    1789 Views
    August 7, 1931. Former Cubs catcher Jimmy Archer adds to his legend. Jimmy was one of the best players on the Cubs during his decade in a Chicago uniform, being named to the “All American” team three years in a row (1912-1914). His throwing arm was the envy of the league. Chief Meyers, th...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Aug 6th, 2019
    2 Comments
    3491 Views
    August 6, 1959 Billy Williams makes his major league debut with the Cubs. He plays left field and bats third, and in his first big league at-bat, facing journeyman Phillies pitcher Jim Owens, Billy drives in Tony Taylor with the first run of the game. That turns out to be the game winner, as the [&he...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Aug 5th, 2019
    0 Comments
    1602 Views
    ~Rube Novotney 1924–1987 (Cubs 1949) Novotney was a University of Illinois product who got one short cup of coffee with the Cubs in 1949. He was a backup catcher who appeared in 22 games. He hit .269 in his limited appearances. Rube also played nine seasons in the minor leagues. ~Tony Jacobs 19...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Weeks Historical Events
    Jul 31st, 2019
    2 Comments
    3785 Views
    August 2, 1923 President Warren G. Harding dies unexpectedly. He wasn’t from Chicago, but Chicago nevertheless played an important role in the his presidency. For one thing, in 1920 he was nominated by Republican party leaders in a smoke filled Chicago hotel room; Suite 4046 on the 13th floor o...