• EveryCubEver

    Bill Lee

    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Weeks Historical Events
    Jun 19th, 2019
    1 Comment
    3221 Views
    When the Rolling Stones came to Chicago in 1972, they were huge stars How huge? They stayed at the Playboy Mansion with Hugh Heffner. Robert Greenfield’s book, “S.T.P.: A Journey Through America with the Rolling Stones,” describes that Chicago trip this way… “The couches...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jun 4th, 2019
    3 Comments
    3377 Views
    June 5, 1985 The Cubs played the game featured in the movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”. If you’ve seen the movie, you probably remember the three goof offs spending the day at the ballpark. It wasn’t a recreated game–it was an actual Wednesday afternoon game at Wri...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 7th, 2019
    4 Comments
    3870 Views
    May 8, 1963 Cubs pitcher Bob Buhl ends his long nightmare. Pitchers are not supposed to be great hitters, but Bob Buhl had taken that concept to a whole different level. His record setting streak began in 1961, when he was still with the Milwaukee Braves. That year he got a whopping 4 hits in [&helli...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Nov 25th, 2018
    0 Comments
    2124 Views
    ~Joe DiMaggio 1914 (Offered to the Cubs 1934) He was never a member of the Chicago Cubs, but he could have been. That’s right: The Chicago Cubs passed on Joe DiMaggio. Is there anything that sums up a bad century better than that sentence? The sad part of the story is that it was even […...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Nov 15th, 2018
    0 Comments
    1458 Views
    ~Franklin P. Adams 1881 (Cubs hater/immortalizer) He wrote the most famous poem ever written about the Cubs, “Baseball’s Sad Lexicon”, and it was so memorable it probably got Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance elected into the Hall of Fame. The poem went as follows… Th...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Oct 21st, 2018
    0 Comments
    1954 Views
    ~George Bell 1959 (Cubs 1991) Bell was a three-time all-star and former MVP when the Cubs signed him to a big free agent contract before the 1991 season. He had a good year with the Cubs, slugging 25 homers and hitting .285, but his long-term value to the Cubs came during the following offseason. The...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Oct 1st, 2018
    0 Comments
    2880 Views
    October 1, 1932 The most famous moment in Wrigley Field history occurred. Or did it? It was Game 3 of the World Series. The Yankees had won the first two at Yankee Stadium. Soon-to-be President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (sitting next to Chicago mayor Anton Cermak) threw out the first pitch. In the st...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Aug 20th, 2018
    1 Comment
    2513 Views
    August 22, 1982 The Cubs retire the first number in franchise history: #14 in honor of Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks. No-one had worn #14 since Ernie retired as a coach in 1973, but by raising the #14 flag the Cubs make it official. In the lineup for the Cubs that day is a rookie third […]...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jul 23rd, 2018
    2 Comments
    2612 Views
    July 23, 1962 The Cubs make television history. Their game against the Philadelphia Phillies in Wrigley Field is beamed into Europe by Telstar, the first communications satellite. This is the first live sporting event from America ever beamed into Europe. The Cubs lineup that day features the Rookie ...