• EveryCubEver

    This Week In Wrigley History

    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 28th, 2021
    2 Comments
    4152 Views
    May 30, 1922 The goat of the 1918 World Series, Max Flack, was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for fellow outfielder Cliff Heathcote between games of a double header. Flack was a fan favorite until he dropped a crucial fly ball in the ninth inning of the deciding game of the 1918 World Series. [&he...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 21st, 2021
    1 Comment
    3308 Views
    May 21, 1935 The immortal Babe Ruth played his last game at Wrigley Field. Ruth was a shell of his former self, struggling to stay afloat with the Boston Braves. And he made three outs his first three times to the plate, but in his last at bat ever in Wrigley Field, Babe Ruth stepped […]...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 14th, 2021
    3 Comments
    4902 Views
    May 15, 1960 In his first start since being acquired from the Phillies, Cubs pitcher Don Cardwell has the most miraculous debut in Cubs history. He is facing the St. Louis Cardinals in the second game of a double header at Wrigley Field. Stan Musial was given the game off, but the Cardinals lineup st...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 7th, 2021
    4 Comments
    5876 Views
    May 8, 1963 Cubs pitcher Bob Buhl ends his long nightmare. Pitchers are not supposed to be great hitters, but Bob Buhl had taken that concept to a whole different level. His record setting streak began in 1961, when he was still with the Milwaukee Braves. That year he got a whopping 4 hits in [&helli...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Apr 30th, 2021
    2 Comments
    4802 Views
    May 2, 1917. Only one pitcher in Major League history has lost a no-hitter to another pitcher throwing a no-hitter. Of course, that player was a Cub: Hippo Vaughn. Only 3500 fans were in the stands at Weeghman Park (now known as Wrigley Field). Fred Toney was pitching for the Reds. Vaughn was the ace...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Apr 23rd, 2021
    4 Comments
    5711 Views
    April 23, 1914. One day after the Cubs drew the smallest Opening Day crowd in their history, a new ballpark opened on Addison & Clark. At the time, it was called “Weeghman Park”, and the team that played there was in the Federal League. This is how the Chicago Tribune described that ...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Apr 16th, 2021
    3 Comments
    5198 Views
    April 16, 1972 Cubs rookie Burt Hooton throws a no-hitter in only his fourth big league start. He walks seven and strikes out seven Phillies on a cold and blustery Wrigley afternoon, throwing 120 pitches in the process.The Philadelphia lineup is no pushover. Among the good hitters Hooton has to face:...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Apr 1st, 2021
    4 Comments
    6337 Views
    April 4, 1994 First Lady Hillary Clinton appears at Wrigley Field to throw out the first pitch. Hillary later sits in the booth with Harry Caray and sings “Take Me Out To The Ballgame” with him. At one point, Harry grabs her and gives her a big wet kiss with his fleshy, meaty lips. Judgin...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Mar 4th, 2021
    1 Comment
    8928 Views
    March 31, 2008 The Cubs opened their 2008 season at Wrigley Field by unveiling the statue of Mr. Cub, Ernie Banks. The statue was given a place of honor on the corner of Clark and Addison right by Wrigley Field’s main gate. Ernie was on hand to commemorate the honor, and so were a bevy [&hellip...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Feb 3rd, 2021
    0 Comments
    5634 Views
    ~Februay 9, 1914 Wrigley Field (then known as Weeghman Park) was just a few months away from opening its doors for the first time when a boy was born to Chicago sportswriter Bill Bailey and his wife. Bailey’s real last name was Veeck, and he named his son after himself, William Veeck Jr. The el...