• EveryCubEver

    This Week In Wrigley History

    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jul 23rd, 2020
    2 Comments
    3652 Views
    July 23, 1962 The Cubs make television history. Their game against the Philadelphia Phillies in Wrigley Field is beamed into Europe by Telstar, the first communications satellite. This is the first live sporting event from America ever beamed into Europe. The Cubs lineup that day features the Rookie ...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jul 16th, 2020
    2 Comments
    5717 Views
    July 16, 1916. In the midst of their first year playing in this fancy new ballpark, the Chicago Cubs become the first team to allow their fans to keep the balls hit into the stands. That was the brainchild of their owner Charlie Weeghman (photo), who was a marketing visionary. It wasn’t long be...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jul 9th, 2020
    3 Comments
    4750 Views
    July 10, 1990 The All-Star Game was played at Wrigley Field. It was a miserable, rainy night, but the fans were treated to the sight of some all-time greats plying their trade. The American League team featured the likes of future Hall of Famers Rickey Henderson, Wade Boggs, Kirby Puckett, Dennis Eck...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jul 2nd, 2020
    2 Comments
    3705 Views
    July 2, 1917. Three future NFL Hall of Famers played at Cubs Park (now known as Wrigley Field) in a big league baseball game. Paddy Driscoll (photo) played 2B for the Cubs. That was his only year in baseball, but he went on to a great football career with the Chicago Bears and the Chicago […]...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jun 25th, 2020
    2 Comments
    3853 Views
    June 29, 1969 The Cubs celebrated “Billy Williams Day” at Wrigley Field. They were playing a double-header against the Cardinals, and the surging Cubs didn’t disappoint, winning both games. Fergie Jenkins won the opener 3-1, and Dick Selma followed suit in the second game, winning 1...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jun 18th, 2020
    2 Comments
    3406 Views
    June 20, 1953. The official temperature in Chicago is 104 degrees; the hottest recorded day in Chicago history. The heat doesn’t stop the Cubs or Dodgers, who play a day game in the unrelenting sun at Wrigley Field. Incredibly, 17,000+ fans come out to smolder in the steamy hot ballpark and wat...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jun 11th, 2020
    2 Comments
    4203 Views
    June 14, 1949 Eddie Waitkus became a household name in America, but he certainly didn’t want it to happen the way it did. While he was with the Cubs, the young first baseman was known for his great defense, his smoking line-drives, and his left-handed bat. The pinnacle of his Cubs career came i...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    Jun 4th, 2020
    3 Comments
    4486 Views
    June 5, 1985 The Cubs played the game featured in the movie “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off”. If you’ve seen the movie, you probably remember the three goof offs spending the day at the ballpark. It wasn’t a recreated game–it was an actual Wednesday afternoon game at Wri...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 28th, 2020
    2 Comments
    3759 Views
    May 30, 1922 The goat of the 1918 World Series, Max Flack, was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for fellow outfielder Cliff Heathcote between games of a double header. Flack was a fan favorite until he dropped a crucial fly ball in the ninth inning of the deciding game of the 1918 World Series. [&he...
    By Rick Kaempfer
    In This Week In Wrigley History
    May 21st, 2020
    1 Comment
    2985 Views
    May 21, 1935 The immortal Babe Ruth played his last game at Wrigley Field. Ruth was a shell of his former self, struggling to stay afloat with the Boston Braves. And he made three outs his first three times to the plate, but in his last at bat ever in Wrigley Field, Babe Ruth stepped […]...