• EveryCubEver

    Today’s Cubs Birthdays (January 19)

    By Rick Kaempfer
    In Today's Cub Birthday
    Jan 19th, 2022
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    Ken Frailing~Ken Frailing 1948 (Cubs 1974-76)
    He was part of the Ron Santo trade with the White Sox (along with Steve Stone and Steve Swisher). He was mainly used as a swing man, switching between the bullpen and starting. He did pitch one complete game. (Photo: Topps 1975 Baseball Card)

    ~Ollie Hanson 1896 (Cubs 1921)
    He got a very brief shot with the Cubs in 1921. Very brief. Eight days, to be precise. In those eight days he was the starting pitcher twice. In his first start on April 27, 1921 at Redland Field, he pitched pretty well against Cincinnati. He went the distance and gave up only two runs in a 2-1 loss. His second start was his only one at Wrigley Field (then known as Cubs Park). He gave up five earned runs in one inning and was yanked out of the game. Ollie never made it back to the big leagues.

    ~Anthony Young 1966 (Cubs 1994-95)
    Anthony will always be remembered for his O-fer streak. From May 6, 1992–July 24, 1993 (while with the Mets), Anthony went 27 consecutive starts without a win. He eventually won seven games for the Cubs over two seasons. Sadly, Anthony passed away in 2017, the victim of an inoperable brain tumor.

    ~Phil Nevin 1971 (Cubs 2006)
    He was a member of the Cubs for exactly two months, but during that time the former #1 overall pick in the draft did pretty well. He hit 12 homers filling in for the injured Derrek Lee.

    ~Kevin Coffman 1965 (Cubs 1990)
    The Cubs got him in the Jody Davis trade, and things never really worked out in Chicago. His 11.26 ERA in 18.2 innings pretty much sums it up.

    ~Chris Stynes 1973 (Cubs 2002)
    He had a couple of really good seasons as a third baseman for the Reds before coming to Chicago, but with the Cubs he hit only .241. He’s more remembered for his goggles than his hitting stroke.

    ~Amaury Telemaco 1974 (Cubs 1996-1998)
    He did manage to pitch in the big leagues for nine seasons, but if you look at his stats, you have to wonder how he pulled it off. His lifetime ERA is 4.94.

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